Requirements for Mexican Citizenship in 2022 (VIDEO)

VIDEO TRANSCRIPT

Hey everybody! Qroo Paul here. I have received numerous questions from people asking about the specific requirements to get Mexican citizenship. There seems to be some confusion out there an I think that is due to the fact that the requirements will differ depending on the circumstances of the person.

But don’t worry, in this video I’m going to break down the applicable Mexican laws for you, and by the end of this thing, you should have a better understanding of what will be required of you should you choose to seek citizenship.

Alright, let’s get started.

Based on your particular set of circumstances, you are going to fall into one of three categories: the fast track, the 2-year track or the 5 year track. FYI, those are not official legal terms – those are just terms that I am using to better explain the law to you.

The Fast Track

This one is exactly what the name would imply – fast. In the time it takes to file the paperwork and get it approved, folks in this group can get their citizenship without taking any exams or even proving that they can speak Spanish. Sounds great, right? Well, this is a very exclusive group with only one requirement:

  • That one or more of your parents is a Mexican citizen either by birth of naturalization. If you fall into this category, you can get your citizenship quite easily through the Secretaría de Relaciones Exteriores (SRE).

One additional note about this. If you research this on your own, you may read that one of the requirements is that the parent who is Mexican by birth must ALSO have been born in Mexico. That was the old law. On May 17, 2021, Article 30 the Mexican Constitution was changed to eliminate that additional requirement. Click HERE to see the text as recorded in the Diario de la Federacion.

That brings us to the next track…The 2-year track.

2-Year Track

Members of the 2-year track must reside in Mexico as a lawful resident for a minimum of two years before applying for citizenship – hence the name of the category – and be one of the following:

Direct descendent of a Mexican by birth. This is where those folks who couldn’t get the fast track because maybe their grandparents were Mexican citizens but their parents never took the steps to claim their citizenship.   (RLN ARTÍCULO 17) (LN Artículo 20)

  • Married a Mexican citizen
  • Have Mexican children by birth (this includes adopted children)
  • Be from a Latin American country or the Iberian Peninsula. Where is that, you may ask? That’s where you’ll find Spain and Portugal.
  • Be a foreigner who has provided some service or done outstanding work that benefitted mexico in one or more of the following categories: culture, social, science, technology, arts, sports o even business.

Those are the folks who can qualify potentially qualify for the 2-year club. So, does that mean they can just fill out some forms and get citizenship. No, only the folks in the fast-track are that lucky. There are a few more requirements for folks in the two year club and here they are:

  • You must pass a cultural and history test. Minors, refugees and people 60 years or over are exempt from this requirement HOWEVER, they will still have to prove they know Spanish. That brings us to the next requirement:
  • If you are not a native Spanish speaker, you will have to demonstrate that you know Spanish. This is now being done, in part, with a written exam that I will explain in more detail later in the video.
  • In the two years prior to applying, you can not have been outside of Mexico for more than 180 days total. You will be required to show all of your entries and exits during that time.

There are forms to fill out and additional documents to get, like a criminal history check from the Mexican authorities, but that’s about it.

5-Year Track

If you did not qualify for either of the first two categories, this is where you end up. In order to apply for citizenship, you must reside in Mexico as a lawful resident for a minimum of 5 years.

The rest of the requirements are the same as the ones for the 2-year track:

  • In the two years prior to applying, you can not have been outside of Mexico for more than 180 days total. You will be required to show all of your entries and exits during that time.
  • You must pass a cultural and history test. Minors, refugees and people 60 years or over are exempt from this requirement HOWEVER, they will still have to prove they know Spanish.

One of the stumbling blocks for many people applying for citizenship is the history and culture exam, as well as proving their knowledge of Spanish…so, I will address those:

First the history and culture exam. This is a 10 question multiple choice, written test in Spanish designed to test your knowledge of Mexican culture and history. The questions can cover a wide range of subjects and they are not easy. Here are some examples of what to expect:

¿Cuál fue la guerra de los tres años?

¿Cuándo se fundó el IFE?

¿Qué presidente fue asesinado en 1928?

Like I said, this is not an easy test. You have 10 minutes to complete it and you are required to get 8 out of 10 to pass.

If Spanish is not your first language, you will have to demonstrate that you know the language. Even if you are exempt from the culture and history test because you are 60 or over, this one still applies to you.

This test consists of a brief interview, followed by a reading comprehension test. You will read a text in Spanish and then answer 5 multiple choice questions. There is also a short writing section. In that section, you will be shown a picture — for example three women dancing — and you will be asked to write three sentences in Spanish about it. You will only have 10 minutes to complete the written portion. The maximum score is 6 points and you must get at least 4.

If you fail one or more of the exams, you have to wait 10 days to take it again. If you fail a second time, your application is cancelled and you will have to wait a minimum of three months from that date to reapply from scratch. That means paying all of the fees again etc.

Well, there you have it. I hope found the video informative. if you did, do me a favor a give it a thumbs up. Until next time, hasta luego.

About the Author

Qroo Paul
Paul Kurtzweil (Q-Roo Paul) was a deputy sheriff in Florida for 25 years before retiring at the rank of lieutenant in 2015. He and his wife moved to Mexico looking to maximize their retirement income. They later started a blog called Two Expats Mexico (qroo.us) to share their experiences as well as information about the logistical and legal aspects of retiring south of the border.

10 Comments on "Requirements for Mexican Citizenship in 2022 (VIDEO)"

  1. Paul, thanks for the great info as always. It seems to me the biggest cons to be a naturalized Mexican citizen are losing consular protection which is huge and nobody talks about it and also minimum residency requirement in a 5-year period which ironically not so to temporary or permanent residents.

  2. Thank you! Where do you live now?

  3. Maria K Cavendish | April 30, 2022 at 2:29 pm | Reply

    Thank you, as always…. Are there no financial requirements?

  4. You have to meet the financial requirement to be a permanent resident to get you permanent resident card and then when you apply for Mexican citizenship, the cost for nationalization is 5,020 pesos (about US$251), payable at the time of your interview. They will give you a form to pay at the bank. It takes 4 to 5 months to receive your official documentation if approved.

  5. What is finacial minimum

  6. William Miller | May 1, 2022 at 5:40 pm | Reply

    Is this dual citizenship or do you have to relinquish your US citizenship?

    • No, not your U.S. citizenship. It may affect other citizenships that a person may have though.

  7. Imagine a person having to learn and be able to speak and write the language of the country they want to be a citizen of… I won’t go there.

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